Order Now

Order Now

A new study published in an open-access article in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative medicine concluded that dogs with hemangiosarcoma treated with a compound derived from the Coriolus versicolor mushroom had the longest survival times ever reported for dogs with the disease providing hope that the compound might one day offer cancer patients a viable alternative treatment to chemotherapy. The mushroom commonly known as Yunzhi mushrooms have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years and is believed to have immune-boosting properties in the compound known as polysaccharopeptine or PSP. Over the past two decades some studies have suggested PSP may also have tumor fighting effects.

Continue Reading

In a study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine and published recently in an open-access article in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine1, dogs with hemangiosarcoma -- an aggressive, malignant cancer that develops in the cells of blood vessels – were given a compound derived from a type of mushroom, Coriolus versicolor.

According to researchers, the patients given this compound had the longest survival times ever reported for dogs with this form of cancer. This is certainly promising news, as this mushroom compound could offer an alternative to chemotherapy or a complementary treatment to traditional cancer therapies for dogs and people.

Continue Reading

AsianScientist (Sep. 20, 2012) – A mushroom compound may help dogs with cancer survive longer than without treatment, offering pet owners an alternative to chemotherapy for their pooches.

Known commonly by its Chinese name yun zhi (云芝), C. versicolor is recognized in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment for cancer.

In a recent study published in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Professor Dorothy Cimino-Brown and Jennifer Reetz from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in the United States found that a compound in the Yunzhi mushroom called polysaccharopeptide, or PSP, has immune-boosting and tumor-fighting properties.

Continue Reading

Two recent studies have shown real progress in killing cancer cells in dogs.

The first study, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, reports that myxoma, a pox virus that affects rabbits but not humans, dogs or other vertebrates studied so far, infects several different types of canine cancer cells in cell culture while sparing healthy cells. The study adds to the evidence that viruses or modified viruses will emerge as relatively benign cancer treatments to complement or replace standard cancer therapies.

Published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research, this study is unique in that it focused on spontaneously occurring cancers in dogs, allowing the researchers to avoid a common practice of testing viral therapies on mice or rats with induced human cancers. Such animals must be immunosuppressed to prevent their immune systems from rejecting the foreign tissue, complicating the results.

Continue Reading

Just like humans, pets are also at risk of being affected with a wide variety of cancers including bone cancer, skin cancer, cancer of the lymphatic system, mammary cancer, and ovarian cancer (along with others).

One of the most mysterious and formidable forms of cancer encountered by veterinarians is hemangiosarcoma. According to an article recently published on the National Canine Cancer Association website, this incurable tumor of the cells lining the blood vessels occurs more commonly in dogs and accounts for five to seven percent of the types of canine cancer seen by veterinary practices. While this condition may occur in dogs of any age, it is more commonly found in middle aged or older dogs. It also more frequently affects breeds including the Portuguese Water Dog, Golden Retriever, German Shepherd, Skye Terrier and Boxer.

Continue Reading

 

 Contact Us

Have Questions?
Need Help?

Call us now or
send an email

866-932-9993
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.